Dating old ink bottles

Since there were hundreds of thousands of uniquely different bottles produced in the United States (and Canada**) between the late 18th century and the 1950s (Fike 1987), it is beyond the scope or even possibility of this site (or website or book) to provide specific details about more than just a tiny fraction of a percent of that variety of bottles.Even then the bottles discussed in depth are so primarily to illustrate the presented information and concepts.See the following "Organization & Structure" section for the specific bottle types that this website includes in the "household" category.The other typology pages (e.g., "Liquor/Spirits bottles", "Food Bottles & Canning Jars", etc.) have larger introductory sections than this page or the "Miscellaneous & Foreign bottles" page.This page and associated sub-pages allows a user to run an American produced utilitarian bottle or a significantly sized bottle fragment through a series of questions based primarily on diagnostic physical, manufacturing related characteristics or features to determine the approximate manufacturing age range of the item.As Berge (1980) noted in referring to bottles, the "..of manufacture of glass containers provides observable attributes which seem to be very useful in a classification of these artifacts." Thus, this page.This bottle dating "key" is a relatively simple "first cut" on the dating of a bottle.While running a bottle through the key questions, the user is frequently directed to move to other website pages to explain diagnostic features and concepts as well as to add depth and/or precision to the initial dating estimate.

Square or rectangular shaped bottles often came in different and creative forms.This is because the "household" and "miscellaneous" categories are much wider ranging in diversity and lacking the tighter or narrower "theme" of the other major categories.Instead, this page will have specific bottle type introductions incorporated into the opening paragraphs within each given section listed.The Bureau of Land Management (BLM), an agency within the U. Department of the Interior, administers 261 million surface acres of America's public lands, located primarily in 12 Western States (including Alaska).Part of the mission of the BLM is the management and preservation of the cultural and heritage resources found on America's public lands - prehistoric and historic.